The Weird and Wonderful World of Words

A comprehensive list of sources used in the making of The Weird and Wonderful World of Words

Below is a comprehensive list of sources that were used to make this book. These have been arranged in the order the facts appeared:

Page 4: Words in a lifetime Huffington Post
Page 5: Average WPMWordCounter.net
Page 6: World languagesEthnologue
Page 8: Early humansNoam Chomsky via Wikipedia
Page 10: Swearing birdsTreehugger
Page 11: KokoDaily Mail
Page 12: CuneiformAncient History Encyclopedia
Page 14: Top 5Babbel
Page 16: DictionaryOED and QI
Page 17: New OED wordsOED
Page 18: OMGHuffington Post
Page 20: Titin the TitanGizmodo
Page 21: Ajay SheshMumbai Newsbox
Page 22: ABC: Top 3 / Bottom 3OED
Page 23: Most common wordsGlobal Language Monitor and OED and Collins Dictionary
Page 25: Age and vocabThe Economist
Page 26: ComputerOnline Etymology Dictionary
Page 27: CerberusOnline Etymology Dictionary
Page 28: Goodbye, DaisyOnline Etymology Dictionary and Online Etymology Dictionary
Page 32: GirlOnline Etymology Dictionary
Page 34: Fast talkersSlate and Guinness World Records
Page 36: Sign languageGallaudet University Library
Page 38: The letter ‘S’OED
Page 39: 4 wordsBored Panda
Page 40: PlacenamesWikipedia
Page 44: GhostsGrammarly
Page 45: SmogOnline Etymology Dictionary
Page 50: Language of the skyMental Floss
Page 52: No vowelsCollins English Dictionary
Page 53: GadsbyMental Floss
Page 55: Longest palindromeNorvig.com
Page 56: CiceroFun With Words.com
Page 60: Words per dayABC
Page 62: SedgwickMilitary History Now
Page 63: MellonMental Floss

If you have any further questions about the book, please contact us at admin@wdog.com.au.